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GQ: 'Ken Mehlman isn't gay', and Repug hypocrites on the Hill

Thursday, March 17, 2005


GQ pic via Raw Story.
"Ken Mehlman is not gay," Steve Schmidt, a senior official of the Bush campaign and a friend of Mehlman's told Jake Tapper, an ABC News correspondent who wrote the piece for the magazine.
(Raw Story via AmericaBlog). So I guess Schmidt saw Ken f*cking a woman as proof? How the heck is that a clearing of the air when the man himself won't say is he's gay or not...oh nevermind...It's all in the latest issue of GQ, including interviews with John Aravosis and Mike Rogers of RawStoryQ/BlogActive.

The more interesting aspect of the article is the kept-inside-the-Beltway fact that the Repugs are personally more tolerant than their constituents when it comes to their gay staffers. Hypocrites, all.
Republicans in Congress appear as ghosts in the piece saying they won't fire staffers who are outed as gay. Rogers began his campaign outing some staff members of prominent congressmen who voted against gay rights.

"One person related to me a story of Republican congressman Henry Hyde of Illinois joking that if he ever ran into Rogers, he'd punch him in the nose," Tapper writes. "Senator Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina reportedly told her staff they had nothing to worry about, should any of them be outed. With the exception of Senator Inhofe parsing between his personal and committee staffs, no one has said anything to distance himself or herself from a gay staffer Rogers has targeted."

Inhofe, senator from Oklahoma, has said he would hire gays for his committee staff in Washington but not at his district office.

Barney Frank, a Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, comes to Rogers defense. Frank is one of three openly gay members of Congress. "There still is this official doctrine that we're immoral," Frank told Tapper for the piece. "But the Republican attitude is that they have now moved to the point where they accept the fact that you're gay as long as you act somewhat embarrassed about it."

One staffer tells Tapper a fact known inside the beltway but not widely reported-that some members of Congress posture as being more anti-gay than they actually are to please constituents. "We're a representative democracy," the staffer told GQ. "And while members may not have personal problems with having gay staff, they vote the way their constituents want them to."
It's the Mary Cheney syndrome. You're ok as long as you're quiet and hidden away like crazy granny in the attic.