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Young NC wingnut sucks up to geezer wingnut

Wednesday, September 21, 2005


Guess they rolled the pre-corpse coot into his Raleigh office for this photo op with Congressman Patrick McHenry.

Patrick McHenry (R-NC-10) is the youngest member of the 109th Congress (born in 1975). Little Pat's your garden-variety asshat Southern conservative -- anti-choice, against same-sex marriage, for the "sanctity of life" -- and also an ace brown-noser, as you see in the above photo with the barely-breathing retired five-term Senator Jesse Helms. Read the shameless butt-kissing. (NC Rumors):
"As a strong fiscal and social conservative, I look to those who have served before me for guidance, and there is no greater conservative of our time than Jesse Helms," Congressman McHenry stated. "I am keenly aware of the role that Senator Helms played in getting Ronald Reagan elected, helping bring about the fall of communism and in defending our moral values that are under attack every day in this country."

...Senator Helms also took the opportunity to sign a copy of his new autobiography, Here's Where I Stand, for Congressman McHenry. The book, which the Senator spent the last two years writing, will debut in bookstores this week and a Washington, DC gala will be held to celebrate its release. Congressman McHenry was honored to be asked to deliver the invocation at the event. "I am deeply humbled to be asked to participate in an event of this magnitude honoring our State's greatest senator ever," McHenry commented.
Pass the barf bag, please. While McHenry has Mr. Helms on the pedestal, here's a little reminder of the brand of conservatism Jesse represents, courtesy of The Independent Weekly piece on him, describing his WRAL-TV editorials that spewed the most bigoted crap imaginable.
What he doesn't say is that the 2,751 editorials were based in some of the most venal bigotry of the times. "Are civil rights only for Negroes?" he asked in 1963. "White women in Washington who have been raped and mugged on the streets in broad daylight have experienced the most revolting sort of violation of their civil rights. The hundreds of others who had their purses snatched last year by Negro hoodlums may understandably insist that their right to walk the street unmolested was violated."

In his five-minute editorials, Helms condoned lunch-counter segregation; said civil-rights protesters were "no less an affront to society" than the Ku Klux Klan; and accused civil-rights marchers of participating in "sex orgies of the rawest sort." He also insisted that four Alabama Klansmen who murdered a Detroit woman in 1965 were responding to "deliberate provocation" by Martin Luther King Jr. and President Lyndon Johnson. If Helms feels any remorse for inflaming racial tensions in North Carolina during the 1960s, he reveals none of it in his new autobiography.
By the way, all of Helms's closest winger friends showed up to pay tribute to him the other night at a big shindig (my earlier post on that is here). Even Chimpy sent a video air-kiss:
President Bush appeared in a video message, listing Helms' accomplishments, including his sponsorship of legislation calling for regime change in Iraq under Saddam Hussein.

"When Jesse Helms came to Washington in 1973, conservatives were a lonely crowd in Washington," Bush said. "But over the course of three decades in the Senate, the world moved in his direction."